WHITE WINES

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The grapes are harvested once we consider that maturity has been reached: balance between sugar and total acidity (and concentration of aromas also for aromatic grape varieties). The harvest is manual with great attention paid to sorting. The harvest is stored in containers until it arrives at the estate where the grapes are put in the press.

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For some years now, we have been working with a pneumatic membrane press which allows us to extract the juice very delicately; the pressure is low and the cycle lasts several hours.
Throughout the pressing process, the must is regularly pumped and sent to one of our stainless steel tanks at a low temperature (around 10°C). After 48 hours, we carry out the settling; this consists in removing the biggest residues and deposits.

 

This is when the yeasts naturally present in the grapes will degrade the sugars by transforming them into alcohol: the alcoholic fermentation begins! This stage, which is the most important during the winemaking process, takes only a few days for some wines or a few months for others. The duration is specific to each harvest, each vat, each plot, each grape variety.

Some white wines can also undergo malolactic fermentation naturally and spontaneously. The transformation of malic acid into lactic acid results in a wine with less acidity and more roundness.
 

As soon as the fermentation is finished, we carry out racking (which consists in removing the residues of the fermentation, especially dead yeasts) and followed by sulphiting (for protection).


Maturing can then begin; for several months, the fine particles suspended in the wine gently settle at the bottom of the tank forming the lees. The character, colors and expression of the wine assert themselves during this stage. Our Grands Crus and Vendanges Tardives are aged in wooden tuns.

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The wines are stabilized and clarified before bottling by filtration. The lees are removed, impurities extracted; a final analysis is carried out to ensure the analytical characteristics.
After all this process, the wine is ready for us to bottle it!

Some small clarifications on the sweetness of the wines!
A wine that is dry (containing less than 4g/L of residual sugar) is a wine that is completely fermented, i.e. all the sugars have been broken down into alcohol.
On the contrary, in a semi-dry, semi-sweet or sweet wine that still contains residual sugars, the fermentation is not complete (this can be voluntary or natural).

 

RED WINES

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The vinification of Pinot Noir differs from that of the white grape varieties as soon as the harvest is finished. Indeed, the grapes are not pressed when they arrive in the winery. A maceration is necessary beforehand to extract in particular the color of the skin (the juice of Pinot Noir is white, it is only on contact with the skin that it changes its color) but also other molecules contained in the berry. 

Grapes are crushed (release of juice by puncturing the berries) and partially de-stemmed (removal of stalks from the bunch). These two operations have very precise objectives:

Destemming improves the extraction of tannins and increases the color intensity of the must.

​• The crushing facilitates maceration and promotes contact between the juice and the solid particles.

Maceration is carried out simultaneously with the alcoholic fermentation, generally over fourteen days; the duration is determined by tasting and analytical results. The wine is then pressed and malolactic fermentation begins.

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As soon as the fermentation is finished, we carry out a racking (which consists in removing the residues of the fermentation, especially dead yeasts...) and followed by a sulphiting (for protection).

Maturing can then begin; for several months, the fine particles suspended in the wine gently settle at the bottom of the tank forming the lees. The character, colors and expression of the wine assert themselves during this stage.

The wines are stabilized and clarified before bottling by filtration. The lees are removed, impurities extracted; a final analysis is carried out to ensure the analytical characteristics.
After all this process, the wine is ready for us to bottle it!

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CREMANTS

Sparkling sparkling wine elaborated using the traditional method, Crémant is different from a white wine at bottling. Indeed, a mixture of yeasts and sugars, called liqueur de tirage, is added to the wine at this time.

The famous "prise de mousse" corresponds to the consumption of sugars by the yeasts to form carbon dioxide and ethanol; in other words, a second alcoholic fermentation, this time in the bottle..

The bottles are hermetically sealed and stored in a horizontal position "on slats" for a minimum period of 12 months. This period "on slats" is decisive for the quality of the product: the longer the wine is in contact with the yeasts, the more complex, subtle and refined the aromas will be.

 

At the end of this aging period and before marketing, the yeasts are removed and form a deposit in the bottle. For this, a process that lasts several days will allow the bottles to pass from the horizontal position to the vertical position, the so-called "on tip" position; the deposit is then in the neck of the bottle.

The second step is to place the neck in a freezer tray to form an ice cube. The bottles are then put back in place, decapped and freed from the yeasts caught in the ice cube. The levelling of the volume is done with the liqueur d'expédition, signature of the winemaker, which is a subtle mix between sugar and wine. The bottle is finally corked and then muzzled, which prevents the cork from jumping under the effect of pressure.